Epilepsy

University of Iowa magazine article about epilepsy & SUDEP

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders…

  • 1 in 26 Americans will develop epilepsy in their lifetime.
  • 3 million Americans and 65 million people worldwide currently live with epilepsy.
  • Between 4 and 10 out of 1,000 people on earth live with active seizures at any one time.
  • Epilepsy affects more people than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s combined. Still, epilepsy receives fewer federal dollars per patient than each of these.
  • It is estimated that up to 50,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. from prolonged seizures, Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP), and other seizure-related incidents such as drowning and other accidents.
  • SUDEP accounts for 34% of all sudden deaths in children.
  • Epilepsy responds to treatment about 70% of the time, yet about three-fourths of people with epilepsy in developing countries do not get the treatment they need.
  • It is impossible for a person to swallow his tongue during a seizure. Never put anything in the mouth of someone experiencing a seizure.
  • About one-third of people with epilepsy cannot control their seizures with medicine. This is called refractory or medically intractable epilepsy.
  • In the United States, until the 1970s, it was legal to deny people with seizures access to restaurants, theaters, and other elsewhere. Meanwhile, in 1970 in the UK, a law forbidding people with epilepsy to marry was finally repealed.
  • More than 100,000 of the 2.2 million troops who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan are expected to develop post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE).
  • 150,000: Number of new cases of epilepsy in the United States each year
  • 6 out of 10: Number of people with epilepsy where the cause is unknown.

For more information about epilepsy, please visit Epilepsy Foundation

or:

American Epilepsy Society

Center for Disease Control

Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE)

Finding A Cure for Epilepsy and Seizures (FACES)